Tuesday, September 30, 2014

AGCM Book Club /// Fly on a Dime: How to Find Fabulous Fashion at Any Thirft Shop & Make the Cheap Look Chic by Patrice J. Williams



If you are a virgin to thrifting and want in on the action but don't know how to get started then look no further because Looking Fly on a Dime by Patrice J. Williams comes to the rescue. Patrice is the writer and owner of the style blog Looking Fly on a Dime. This eBook is a thorough guide, yet a light read, chock full of great tips to snag designer and one-of-a-kind pieces to add some flare to your style for cheap, like sometimes even $1 cheap! She includes tips on prep for an outing, thrifting etiquette, what to get and what to put back, whether to thrift alone or with friends, how to sanitize; deordorize and care for your finds and ideas for how to rock your secured goodies. As a seasoned thrifter, the tips she shared are the sames jewels that I would share with newbies. I enjoyed and drew inspiration from the pictures Patrice shared of looks she's created from partially or fully thrifted items. I especially loved the look she created with a beautiful, thrifted cape. I want hers! I so want one for the fall and am hoping the thrifting gods will place a fab one in my view during my next thrifting excursion!

You can find the book through Amazon (Kindle). Happy thrifting!





Milan is a New York City based, creative writer and the founder of AGrlCanMAC. She's a self proclaimed accessories junkie who's passionate about healthy living, adventure, books, crystals, the Law of Attraction and arts & crafts. AGrlCanMAC is a resource for women of color all over the world who want to look good, radiate good and feel good at the same damn time.

Follow AGCM on Twitter /// Instagram /// Pinterest /// Youtube

Monday, September 29, 2014

Women's Sexual & Spiritual Health /// Yoni Eggs

{Image Source: Ashley's Naturals}


Us women are such precious and powerful beings. Our wombs carry and sustain life and give and receive pleasure. They can also carry guilt, shame and other negative energy. Yoni is a sanskrit word for a woman's "sacred space or passage"; it's a more beautiful term for a woman's vagina. I like that word better and think I shall incorporate that into my vocabulary instead. Yoni eggs are made from different crystals to address different types of energies and things going on in your womb and your overall physical and spiritual body.  An egg is inserted into the vagina and kegel exercises are employed over a duration of time to help strengthen your vaginal muscle and keep them tight (especially after you have had a baby and want to "snap it back") to keep the egg inside of you. Some of the other benefits include helping with experiencing stronger orgasms (for you and your partner), the ability to create your own "juices" for comfortable and pleasurable sex and feeling a strong sense of awareness and being in tune with your feminine self and the power.  

Friday, September 26, 2014

Music Than Can Mac /// Sza

http://www.playthishiphop.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/SZA-Z.jpg


Many of you may have heard of Sza. I'm just getting hip to her. Earlier this week, a cool Instagram page I follow, @TheGoodVibe.Music, shared a short clip of her song Babylon (see the video below) and I got sucked in. Her voice to me has that haunting, eerie sound like Lana del Ray. I find that her  "Z" EP puts me into that "weird chill out music" space that I like when I'm at home relaxing. And of course I love her big, bodacious natural hair!



 


Milan is a New York City based, creative writer and the founder of AGrlCanMAC. She's a self proclaimed accessories junkie who's passionate about healthy living, adventure, books, crystals, the Law of Attraction and arts & crafts. AGrlCanMAC is a resource for women of color all over the world who want to look good, be good and feel good at the same damn time.

Follow AGCM on Twitter /// Instagram /// Pinterest /// Youtube

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Don't Wait. Start Saving and Investing NOW.

I actively attract wealth.

"By all means, be responsible and pay back your debts in a timely manner but don't let repayment take precedence over your overall well being."

I'm not a financial analyst, investor, stock broker, adviser, accountant, etc. I'm a woman going through life one hiccup at a time on the quest to "get my shit together" or get it better, at least. Like many, I've gotten myself into debt, gotten myself out of it, only then to get myself back into it. I'm now on the journey to get out of it and stay out of it; end the in-n-out cycle. One thing I'm UNlearning is waiting until my consumer debt is paid off to start saving or investing. I love Suze Orman and maybe I misunderstood her message regarding debt and saving but I interpreted her books and the messages in her show, The Suze Orman Show (which I used to watch religiously), to be encouraging people not to actively contribute to a savings account when they had consumer debts, ie credit card balances, car notes, loans, etc. to pay off. Her reasoning is/was that you are making no money with it sitting in savings (Your money doesn't grow chillin in savings accounts. Their interest rates are too low to see growth. Even high yield savings accounts (CD's included) don't get above 1% these days) and that money could be used towards eliminating your debt much faster.

While I understood what she was saying, I soon realized that living by this philosophy, I had NOTHING for a rainy day. Nothing. I also wasn't putting anything away for my retirement because

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

If I Started a Podcast Station, Would You Listen?



Would you? I'm considering creating a podcast station or Google hangouts discussing various topics that are important to [black] women. I want to have honest and candid conversations that leave us feeling positive, empowered, beautiful, inspired and whole. I want us all to win, there's more than enough to go around. I'd love to include special guests sometimes as well. Let me know and if so what topics you think would be good for me to speak on.


Milan is a New York City based, creative writer and the founder of AGrlCanMAC. She's a self proclaimed accessories junkie who loves healthy living, adventure, books, crystals, the Law of Attraction and arts & crafts. She loves her [natural] hair and will say it loud that she's black and she's proud! AGrlCanMAC is a resource for women of color all over the world who want to live their best lives.

Follow AGCM on Twitter /// Instagram /// Pinterest /// Youtube

Friday, September 19, 2014

AGCM Book Club /// Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie


"-Third Worlders are forward-looking, we like things to be new, because our best is still ahead, while in the West their best is already past and so they have to make a fetish of that past."- page 539 of Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie 


Here's a book for your weekend reading or next book club read.

For someone who isn't a Beyonce stan or fan, I credit "Flawless" for first introducing me to Nigerian author, Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche. The recording/sample of one of her excerpts from her TedX talk, We should all be femenists, caught me right away and I began to research her and her work. For the 16 hour plane ride to South Africa from NY back in July, I decided to read "Americanah ", a tale about main character, Ifemelu's, experiences leaving her home of Nigeria to explore America. I became totally enthralled in Ifemelu's life, thoughts, mistakes and seeing through her Nigerian eyes how American culture and customs were perceived by her. Almost all of her observations, I agreed with. She observed how obsessed with race Americans are and how as a Nigerian in Nigeria, race was never an "issue" or even a real concept. Ifemelu wasn't "black" until she stepped foot on American soil. I enjoyed reading her thoughts on this twisted, deep rooted complex we have in America.

There is also a love story component to the book. When we first meet Ifemelu, she is a young girl in high school getting ready for college and dreaming of her life ahead. We met her first and most important love, Obinze, and how their experiences shape and mold them along their way through their adult lives: she going to America for a few years and Obinze going to London for a while. And then they both end up back in Nigeria and we see how their lives have changed from their experiences and what their relationship becomes. I love love stories rather they end tragically or happily. Love is such a huge part of life!

Though this is fiction, it gave me a different vantage point to see some things from the eyes of non-American black people; African black people. It's a view I'll never get to have because I'm American so I enjoyed seeing things from a different lens. I also took away from the book that no matter what your race, culture, ethnicity or nationality, we all want the same basic things out of life: happiness, love, to live well (in a way that resonates with us) and accomplish our dreams.

And it's also cool that Ifemelu is natural and made a career out of blogging. :-)


Milan is a New York City based, creative writer and the founder of AGrlCanMAC. She's a self proclaimed accessories junkie who loves healthy living, adventure, books, crystals, the Law of Attraction and arts & crafts. She loves her [natural] hair and will say it loud that she's black and she's proud! AGrlCanMAC is a resource for women of color all over the world who want to live their best lives.

Follow AGCM on Twitter /// Instagram /// Pinterest /// Youtube

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Do Black Americans Miss Africa and They Don't EUNO It?


Our guide at Lesedi Cultural Village (in Johannesburg, South Africa) knows that his heritage is of the Zulu tribe. He is pictured here dressed in traditional Zulu attire.

"I just feel there's a certain yearning and lost feeling that many blacks that are the product of the (Trans-Atlantic/) European slave trade have that many of our (black) African brothers and sisters don't."

This post is one of me pondering many things. It's not coming from an intellectual or scholarly place or with scholarly language, wording and writing style. This is not an essay. This IS a black [American] woman with a mind and curiosity wondering about things she's had time and experiences to ruminate on. Simply put, I'm thinking out loud and wondering if anyone has felt the same way or thought similar thoughts. I can only speak from an African American/black American standpoint because that is who I am and that is my experience. These are solely my opinions and you will not be regarded as a "hater" if you do not agree with them. I want to have a conversation and learn your thoughts and takes on this.....

I want my people to have more pride and it not be from white people "approving" of us or from them treating and viewing us as equals. I want us, black Americans, to have a pride in ourselves that's similar to what I feel our (black) African brothers and sisters have in them. I want for my people to have a pride in being of African descent, have a wanting to know about it and reconnect with it and all of us visiting African countries as often as we can. I'm aware that the experiences are different. Slaves' cultures of their respective ethnic groups and tribes were stripped away and erased from them in most cases. Africans who weren't captured got to continue on in their cultures and grow and evolve with them but they had to deal with colonialism which effected them in other ways. I'm aware of the different experiences effecting the pride, level of pride and energy behind the pride but I've often wondered what would happen if all black Americans knew what areas and/or ethnic groups in Africa our ancestors came from? How would it affect our collective self esteem and sense of self worth? Would it effect/change our role in American history if we were able to (or fought to) hold onto our cultures, traditions, languages, etc? How would it have effected the history? Would we have upraised against slavery? Would we have moved back? Would we have been sent back? Would we have simply migrated somewhere else and never returned to Africa? Would we view "afrocentricism" differently? Would afrocentricism even be a concept?! Would we support each other more?
What I wore to a brie I attended in JoBurg. South Africans call a BBQ, a brie.

I also often wonder if all black Americans got fed up with "racism" in America and migrated to countries in Africa, like today in 2014, how would the cultures, traditions, infrastructures and technology change? Would racism leave our [black American] psyches? Would Africans happily receive us with warmth and open arms or reject us? Would it make things better or worse? 

I do think it would be nice to be in a place where your "race" wasn't a thought, constant reminder or real concept because everyone looks like you. You're hated because maybe you really are a bad person, not because of the color of your skin. You're judged by the color of your shoes or if your shirt is wrinkled and dirty not because of the color of your skin. Your intelligence is judged by school grades or thought processing, not by the color of your skin. You'd be called dumb because maybe you really are dumb, not because of the color of your skin. People feel threatened by you because you've got an AK-47 in your hand, not simply because of the color of your skin.

I wonder. These are my opinions and now I want to learn yours. What do you think? What are your thoughts on any of my questions? I welcome any of you posing questions too, if you're moved to do so. I'd love to hear from blacks all over the globe. I just feel there's a certain yearning and lost feeling that many blacks that are a product of the (Trans-Atlantic/) European slave trade have that many of our (black) African brothers and sisters don't. Maybe we still really miss [Africa] home and we don't "euno" it. Please chime in.

Follow AGCM on Twitter ///  Instagram ///  Pinterest /// Youtube

LinkWithin

Blog Widget by LinkWithin
Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.